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Wed, 12 Feb 2014

RAT-a-tat-tat

Hey all,


So following on from my talk (slides, video) I am releasing the NMAP service probes and the Poison Ivy NSE script as well as the DarkComet config extractor.



An example of finding and extracting Camellia key from live Poison Ivy C2's:
nmap -sV -Pn --versiondb=nmap-service-probes.pi --script=poison-ivy.nse <ip_address/range)
Finding Poison Ivy, DarkComet and/or Xtreme RAT C2's:
nmap -sV -Pn --versiondb=nmap-service-probes.pi <ip_range>


If you have any questions, please contact research@sensepost.com
Cheers

Thu, 12 Dec 2013

Never mind the spies: the security gaps inside your phone

For the last year, Glenn and I have been obsessed with our phones; especially with regard to the data being leaked by a device that is always with you, powered on and often provided with a fast Internet connection. From this obsession, the Snoopy framework was born and released.


After 44con this year, Channel 4 contacted us to be part of a new experimental show named 'Data Baby', whose main goal is to grab ideas from the security community, and transform them into an easy-to-understand concept screened to the public during the 7 o'clock news.


Their request was simple: Show us the real threat!


To fulfil their request, we setup Snoopy to intercept, profile and access data from a group of "victim" students at a location in Central London. While this is something we've done extensively over the past twelve months, we've never had to do it with a television crew and cameras watching your every move!


The venue, Evans and Peel Detective Agency, added to the sinister vibe with their offices literally located underground. We were set up in a secret room behind a book case like friggin spies and got the drones ready for action. As the students arrived, we had a single hour to harvest as much information as we could. Using Snoopy, Maltego and a whole lot of frantic clicks and typing (hacking under stress is not easy), we were filmed gaining access to their inbox's and other personal information.


In the end, Snoopy and Maltego delivered the goods and Glenn added a little charm for the ladies.



After the segment was aired, we participated in a live Twitter Q&A session with viewers (so, so many viewers, we had to tag in others to help reply to all the tweets) and gave advice on how they could prevent themselves from being the next victim. Our advice to them, and indeed anyone else concerned is:


How to avoid falling foul of mobile phone snooping
- Be discerning about when you switch Wi-Fi on
- Check which Wi-Fi network you're connecting to; if you're connecting to Starbucks when you're nowhere near a branch, something's wrong
- Download the latest updates for your phone's operating system, and keep the apps updated too
- Check your application providers (like e-mail) security settings to make sure all your email traffic is "encrypted", not just the login process
- Tell your phone to forget networks once you're done with them, and be careful about joining "open" aka "unencrypted" networks

Fri, 22 Nov 2013

Mobile Hacking on the West Coast

December sees SensePost presenting Hacking by Numbers: Mobile at BlackHat West Coast Trainings. This course was first presented at BlackHat Vegas 2013 and 44Con 2013, growing in popularity and content with each iteration. For more information continue reading below or visit https://blackhat.com/wc-13/training/Hacking-by-Numbers-Mobile.html.


The mobile environment has seen immense growth and has subsequently seen organisations racing to be the first to market with the next best app. The rapid increase in mobile popularity and the speed at which developers are forced to produce new applications has resulted in an ecosystem full of security vulnerabilities. As more organisations are moving from web applications to mobile applications, penetration testers are required to adapt their testing methodology to keep pace with the changing platforms. Mobile applications developers have been lulled into a false sense of security due to the belief that "the platform will take care of the security". The Hacking by Numbers: Mobile course aims to help both penetration testers and mobile applications developers to find and understand common security vulnerabilities on a wide range of mobile platforms. The course teaches a mobile application security testing methodology that can easily be applied to mobile applications on Android, iOS, Blackberry and Windows Mobile.


Rather than focus on a specific mobile platform or a set of testing tools, the Hacking by Numbers Mobile course covers the following:


  • Android, iOS, RIM and Windows 8 Platform security

  • Communication protocols

  • Programming languages for mobile development

  • Building your own mobile penetration testing lab

  • Mobile application analysis

  • Static Analysis

  • Authentication and authorization

  • Data validation

  • Session management

  • Transport layer security and information disclosure


The structure of the course makes it ideal for testers and developers new to the mobile application security space, starting with the basic concepts of mobile security testing all the way through to decompilation, analysis and modification of mobile applications. As with all Hacking by Numbers courses, the mobile edition focuses on hands-on experience, with numerous lab exercises designed to provide students with practical experience to match the theory.Previous iterations of the course has seen real world applications being downloaded from the app store and common security vulnerabilities being identified.


Lab exercises include:


  • Finding and retrieving sensitive files.

  • Interception and Analysis of network traffic.

  • Runtime analysis of Application memory state.

  • Decompilation and static analysis of applications.

  • Runtime modification of application functions.
    And many more...


Training will be held from 11-12 December and more information can be found at https://blackhat.com/wc-13/training/Hacking-by-Numbers-Mobile.html.


Looking forward to seeing you all in Seattle!

Fri, 1 Nov 2013

A new owner for a new chapter

We're pleased to announce our acquisition today by SecureData Europe.


SecureData (www.secdata.com) is a complete independent security services provider based in the UK and was also previously part of the SecureData Holdings group before being acquired by management in November 2012. The strategic acquisition complements SecureData's vision for enabling an end-to-end, proactive approach to security for global customers by assessing risk, detecting threats in real-time, protecting valuable assets and responding to security issues when they occur.


This deal signals the culmination of a long period of negotiation between SecureData Holdings, SecureData Europe and SensePost management and represents a cordial and amicable arrangement that is considered to be to the benefit of all three businesses. As the management of SensePost we are fully committed to this change, which we believe is in the best interests of SensePost, our staff and our customers. We believe this move will herald for us a new era of growth and development that will see us better equipped and prepared to meet the requirements of the market and fulfil our mission of providing insight, information and systems that enable our customers to make informed decisions about information security.


We look forward to a to an exciting period of innovation, growth and development that we believe this transaction will ultimately enable!