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Fri, 13 Jun 2014

Using Maltego to explore threat & vulnerability data

This blog post is about the process we went through trying to better interpret the masses of scan results that automated vulnerability scanners and centralised logging systems produce. A good example of the value in getting actionable items out of this data is the recent Target compromise. Their scanning solutions detected the threat that lead to their compromise, but no humans intervened. It's suspected that too many security alerts were being generated on a regular basis to act upon.


The goal of our experiment was to steer away from the usual data interrogation questions of "What are the top N vulnerabilities my scanner has flagged with a high threat?" towards questions like "For how many of my vulnerabilities do public exploits exist?". Near the end of this exercise we stumbled across this BSides talk "Stop Fixing All The Things". Theses researchers took a similar view-point: "As security practitioners, we care about which vulnerabilities matter". Their blog post and video are definitely worth having a look at.


At SensePost we have a Managed Vulnerability Scanning service (MVS). It incorporates numerous scanning agents (e.g. Nessus, Nmap, Netsparker and a few others), and exposes an API to interact with the results. This was our starting point to explore threat related data. We could then couple this data with remote data sources (e.g. CVE data, exploit-db.com data).


We chose to use Maltego to explore the data as it's an incredibly powerful data exploration and visualisation tool, and writing transforms is straight forward. If you'd like to know more about Maltego here are some useful references:


What we ended up building were:

  • Transforms to explore our MVS data

  • A CVE / exploit-db.com API engine

  • Transforms to correlate between scanner data and the created APIs

  • Maltego Machines to combine our transforms


So far our API is able to query a database populated from CVE XML files and data from www.exploit-db.com (they were kind enough to give us access to their CVE inclusive data set). It's a standalone Python program that pulls down the XML files, populates a local database, and then exposes a REST API. We're working on incorporating other sources - threat feeds, other logging/scanning systems. Let us know if you have any ideas. Here's the API in action:


Parsing CVE XML data and exposing REST API
Parsing CVE XML data and exposing REST API


Querying a CVE. We see 4 public exploits are available.
Querying a CVE. We see 4 public exploits are available.


It's also worth noting that for the demonstrations that follow we've obscured our clients' names by applying a salted 'human readable hash' to their names. A side effect is that you'll notice some rather humorous entries in the images and videos that follow.


Jumping into the interesting results, these are some of the tasks that we can perform:


  • Show me all hosts that have a critical vulnerability within the last 30 days

  • Show me vulnerable hosts for which public exploit code exists

  • Show me all hosts for which a vulnerability exists that has the word 'jmx-console' in the description

  • Show me all hosts on in my DMZ that have port 443 open

  • Given a discovered vulnerability on a host, show me all other hosts with the same vulnerability

  • Show me a single diagram depicting every MVS client, weighted by the threat of all scans within the last week

  • Show me a single diagram depicting every MVS client, weighted by the availability of public exploit code

  • Given a CPE, show me all hosts that match it


Clicking the links in the above scenarios will display a screenshot of a solution. Additionally, two video demonstrations with dialog are below.


Retrieving all recent vulnerabilities for a client 'Bravo Tango', and checking one of them to see if there's public exploit code available.
Retrieving all recent vulnerabilities for a client 'Bravo Tango', and checking one of them to see if there's public exploit code available.


Exploring which clients/hosts have which ports open
Exploring which clients/hosts have which ports open


In summary, building 'clever tools' that allow you to combine human insight can be powerful. An experiences analyst with the ability to ask the right questions, and building tools that allows answers to be easily extracted, yields actionable tasks in less time. We're going to start using this approach internally to find new ways to explore the vulnerability data sets of our scanning clients and see how it goes.


In the future, we're working on incorporating other data sources (e.g. LogRhythm, Skybox). We're also upgrading our MVS API - you'll notice a lot of the Maltego queries are cumbersome and slow due to its current linear exploration approach.


The source code for the API, the somewhat PoC Maltego transforms, and the MVS (BroadView) API can be downloaded from our GitHub page, and the MVS API from here. You'll need a paid subscription to incorporate the exploit-db.com data, but it's an initiative definitely worth supporting with a very fair pricing model. They do put significant effort in correlating CVEs. See this page for more information.


Do get in touch with us (or comment below) if you'd like to know more about the technical details, chat about the API (or expand on it), if this is a solution you'd like to deploy, or if you'd just like to say "Hi".

Thu, 5 Jun 2014

Associating an identity with HTTP requests - a Burp extension

This is a tool that I have wanted to build for at least 5 years. Checking my archives, the earliest reference I can find is almost exactly 5 years ago, and I've been thinking about it for longer, I'm sure.


Finally it has made it out of my head, and into the real world!


Be free! Be free!


So, what does it do, and how does it do it?


The core idea for this tool comes from the realisation that, when reviewing how web applications work, it would help immensely to be able to know which user was actually making specific requests, rather than trying to just keep track of that information in your head (or not at all). Once you have an identity associated with a request, that enables more powerful analysis of the requests which have been made.


In particular, it allows the analyst to compare requests made by one user, to requests made by another user, even as those users log in and log out.


There are various ways in which users can be authenticated to web applications, and this extension doesn't try to handle them all, not just yet, anyway. It does handle the most common case, though, which is forms-based auth, with cookie-based session identifiers.


So, as a first step, it allows you to identify the "log in" action, extract the name of the user that is authenticating, and associate that identity with the session ID until it sees a "log out" action. Which is pretty useful in and of itself, I think. Who hasn't asked themselves, while reviewing a proxy history: "Now which user was I logged in as, when I made this request?" Or: "Where is that request that I made while logged in as 'admin'?"


Associating an identity with the requests


So, how does it do this? Unfortunately, the plugin doesn't have AI, or a vast database of applications all captured for you, with details of how to identify logins and logouts. But it does have the ability to define a set of rules, so you can tell it how your app behaves. These rules can be reviewed and edited in the "Options" tab of the Identity extension.


What sort of rules do we need? Well, to start with, what constitutes a valid logon? Typically, that may include something like "A POST to a specified URL, that gets a 200 response without the text 'login failed' in it". And we need to know which form field contains the username. Oh, and the sessionid in use by the application, so that the next time we see a sessionid with the same value, we can link that same identity to that conversation as well.


The easiest way to create the login rule is probably via the Http Proxy History tab. Just right click on a valid login request, and choose "Identity -> create login rule". It will automatically create a rule that matches the request method, request path, and the response status. Of course, you can customise it as you see fit, adding simple rules (just one condition), or complex rules (this AND that, this OR that), nested to arbitrary levels of complexity. And you can select the session id parameter name, and login parameter name on the Options tab as well.


Awesome! But how do we identify when the user logs out? Well, we need a rule for that as well, obviously. This can often be a lot simpler to identify. An easy technique is just to look for the text of the login form! If it is being displayed, you're very unlikely to be logged in, right? That can also catch the cases where a session gets timed out, but for the moment, we have separate rules and states for "logged out" and "timed out". That may not be strictly necessary, though. Again, these rules can be viewed and edited in the Options tab. Another easy way to create the logout rule is to select the relevant text in the response, right-click, and choose "Identity -> create logout rule".


Sweet! So now we can track a series of conversations from an anonymous user, through the login process, through the actions performed by the person who was logged in, through to the end of that session, whether by active logout, or by inactivity, and session timeout, back to an anonymous user.


Most interestingly, though, by putting the conversations into a "spreadsheet", and allowing you to create a pivot table of selected parameters vs the identity of the person making the request, it becomes possible to almost automate the testing of access control rules.


This tool is not quite at the "automated" stage yet, but it does currently allow you to see which user has performed which actions, on which subject, which makes it almost trivial to see what each user is able to do, and then formulate tests for the other users. You can also see which tests you have executed, as the various cells in the pivot table start filling up.


Pivoting requests against the user


In this screenshot, we are pivoting on the path of the URL, the method (GET vs POST), and then a bunch of parameters. In this application (WordPress, just for demonstration purposes), we want the "action" parameter, as well as the parameter identifying the blog post being operated on. The "action" parameter can appear in the URL, or in the Body of the request, and the "post" parameter in the URL identifies the blog post, but it is called post_ID in the body. (It might be handy to be able to link different parameters that mean the same thing, for future development!). The resulting table creates rows for each unique parameter combination, exactly as one would expect in an Excel pivot table.


Clicking on each cell allows you to get a list of all the conversations made by that userid, with the specific combination of parameters and values, regardless of the number of times that they had logged in and out, or how many times their session id changed. Clicking on each conversation in the list brings up the conversation details in the request/response windows at the bottom, so you can check the minutiae, and if desired, right-click and send them to the repeater for replay.


So far, the approach has been to manually copy and paste the session cookie for a different user into the repeater window before replaying the request, but this is definitely something that lends itself to automation. A future development will have an option to select "current" session tokens for identified users, and substitute those in the request before replaying it.


So far, so good! But, since the point of this extension is to check access controls, we'd ideally like to be able to say whether the replayed request was successful or not, right? There's a rule for that! Or there could be, if you defined them! By defining rules that identify "successful" requests vs "failed" requests, conversations can be tagged as successful or not, making it easier to see when reviewing lists of several conversations. Future development is intended to bring that data "up" into the pivot table too, possibly by means of colouring the cells based on the status of the conversations that match. That could end up showing a coloured matrix of successful requests for authorised users, and unsuccessful requests for unauthorised users, which, ultimately, is exactly what we want.


We'd love to hear how you get on with using this, or if you have any feature requests for the plugin. For now, the BurpId plugin is available here.

Fri, 9 May 2014

Wireless Bootcamp Training - Las Vegas

Get some.


Wireless hacking, you say?
You may think wireless hacking is nothing new, and you may think it's just not that relevant or exciting. Come along to our BlackHat Wireless Bootcamp course and we'll show you different! We'll teach you the fundamentals every wireless hacker needs to know, but then move onto the really exciting, cutting edge stuff.



Cutting edge WiFi hacking, you say?
At SensePost we really enjoy wireless hacking - mostly because it gets us good results in terms of compromising our targets! With our years of experience in this area we've written our own tools, as well as refined others. In this course we'll reveal new techniques and tools (can you smell 0day?) that we'll hopefully be presenting at the conference, and give you exclusive hands on training with our very own Snoopy framework (a distributed, tracking, data interception, and profiling framework). Two lucky students who capture our CTFs will also go home with pre-built Snoopy drone. Every student will also get their own Alfa WiFi card to take home, as well as the latest Snoopy pre-release (Snoopy will run fine on your laptop too).

Snoopy Drone


What else?
Here's an exact break down of what to expect from this course:
• Wi-Fi theory and background
• Breaking WEP
• Breaking WPA PSK
• Man in the middle attacks for WPA MGT (new attack vectors)
• Breaking WPS
• Wi-Fi Router back doors
• Rogue Access Points attack scenarios (new attack vectors)
• Exclusive Snoopy training


Who should attend?
Anyone interested in WiFi security. The course is relevant for both attackers and defenders (it'll let you put your defense into context). Students should have some technical ability in Linux, and understand networking fundamentals, but this is a bootcamp level course.


Dominic (@singe) and Glenn (@glennzw) will be your instructors. They're both avid wireless hackers, and never leave home without a high gain antenna and an Alfa card! They're looking forward to training you. You can find the sign-up page here.


-Glenn & Dominic

Mon, 7 Apr 2014

SenseCon 2014

L1000617
What originally started as one of those "hey, wouldn't this be cool?" ideas, has blossomed into a yearly event for us at SensePost. SenseCon is a time for all of us to descend on South Africa and spend a week, learning/hacking/tinkering/breaking/building, together and in person.


A few years ago we made the difficult, and sometimes painful, shift to enable remote working in preparation for the opening of our UK and Cape Town offices. Some of you probably think this is a no-brainer, but the benefit of being in the same room as your fellow hackers can't be overlooked. Being able to call everyone over to view an epic hack, or to ask for a hand when stuck is something tools like Skype fail to provide. We've put a lot of time into getting the tech and processes in place to give us the "hackers in the same room" feel, but this needs to be backed with some IRL interaction too.


People outside of our industry seem to think of "technical" people as the opposite of "creative" people. However, anyone who's slung even a small amount of code, or even dabbled in hacking will know this isn't true. We give our analysts "20% time" each month to give that creativity an outlet (or to let on-project creativity get developed further). This is part of the intention of SenseCon: a week of space and time for intense learning, building, and just plain tinkering without the stresses of report deadlines or anything else.


But, ideas need input, so we try to organise someone to teach us new tricks. This year that was done by Schalk from House 4 Hack (these guys rocks) who gave us some electronic and Arduino skills and some other internal trainings. Also, there's something about an all-nighter that drives creativity, so much so that some Plakkers used to make sure they did one at least once a month. We use our hackathon for that.


Our hackathon's setup is similar to others - you get to pitch an idea, see if you can get two other team mates on board, and have 24 hours to complete it. We had some coolness come out of this last year and I was looking forward to seeing what everyone would come up with this time round.


L1000662


Copious amounts of energy drinks, snacks, biltong and chocolates were on supply and it started after dinner together. The agreed projects were are listed below, with some vagueness, since this was internal after all :)


  • pORTAL anonymous comms device - Sam & Dr Frans


Getting a modified version of Grug's pORTAL device working on a Beagle Bone and Rasperry Pi for us to use while traveling.

  • Video Conferencing - Craig and Marc


For video conferencing we normally use a combination of Skype, Go-To-Meeting, Google hangouts, or a page long gstreamer command piped over a netcat tunnel (I'm not kidding). Craig and Marc built an internal video conferencing solution with some other internal comms tools on the side.

  • SensePost Radar - Keiran and Dane


SensePost Radar
SensePost Radar


Keiran and Dane put our office discone antenna to good use and implemented some SDR-fu to pick up aeroplane transponder signals and decode them. They didn't find MH370, but we now have a cool plane tracker for SP.


  • WiFi Death Flag - Charl


Charl, so incredibly happy!!
Charl, so incredibly happy!!


Using wifi-deauth packets can be useful if you want to knock a station (or several) off a wifi network. Say you wanted to prevent some cheap wifi cams from picking you up ... Doing this right can get complicated when you're sitting a few km's away with a yagi and some binoculars. Charl got an arduino to raise a flag when it was successfully deauthed, and lower it when connectivity is restored for use in a wifi-shootout game.


  • Burp Collaboration tool - Jurgens, Johan & Willem


Inspired by Maltego Teeth, Jurgens set about building a way to have multiple analysts collaborate on one Burp session using a secure Jabber transport. He and Johan got this working well, and we will be releasing it and several other Burp apps during the ITWeb Security Summit in Johannesburg in May.

  • How to Pwn a Country - Panda and Sara


YMCA pwnage
YMCA pwnage


Panda (Jeremy) and Sara ended up building local Maltego transforms that would allow mass/rapid scanning of large netblocks so you can quickly zoom in on the most vulnerable boxes. No countries were harmed in the making of this.


  • Bender - Vladislav


While doing client-side engagements, we realised we needed our own payload to help us to better move from spear-phish to persistent internal network access. Earlier in the year, Vlad put our hacks into a professional SensePost beaconing payload he called Bender. During the hackathon he extended its capability in some key areas.

  • Oh-day stuffs - Georg and Etienne


He likes his ice-cream
He likes his ice-cream


gcp and et decided on some good ol'fashioned fuzz-n-find bug hunting on a commercial mail platform, and websense. Along the way they learned some interesting lessons in how not to fuzz, but in the end found some coolness.


  • 3d Printer - Rogan


Rogan finally got around to putting his 3D printer together! He hasn't printed an SP logo yet, but we're assuming this is the most logical first print.

  • Rogue AP - Dominic & Ian


In preparation for our BlackHat submission, singe and ian spent some time researching our new wifi attacks. This resulted in a key new finding and implementation of their new KARMA rogue-ap attack.

  • The challenge - Daniel


I too had to show that I still had tech skills (not all spreadsheeting you know) and created a challenge to send our peeps down the rabbit hole while pushing their skills but also awaken some old school hacking approaches.


L1000686


The hackathon went gangbusters; most of the team went through the night and into the morning (I didn't, getting old and crashed at 2am). Returning that morning to see everyone still hacking away on their projects (and a few hacking away on their snoring) was amazing.


Once the 24-hours was up, many left the office to grab a shower and refresh before having to present to the entire company later on that afternoon.


Overall this years SenseCon was a great success. Some cool projects/ideas were born, a good time was had AND we even made Charl feel young again. As the kids would say, #winning


 


 


 


 

Wed, 2 Apr 2014

Combat Reloaded

The British Special Air Service (SAS) have a motto that's rather fitting for their line of work - Who Dares Wins


To a degree, the same could be said for our newly updated Hacking by Numbers course, Combat. Penetration testing is sometimes more than following a checklist or going for the easy kill. A good penetration tester knows how to handle all thrown at them, be it a Joomla implementation, or *shudder* an OpenBSD box.



What does prevail in these situations is very much a 'Who Dares Wins' attitude. Sure, you could just give up, report that the box is vulnerable to predictable TCP sequence numbers, issue the PDF and move on, right?


Thought not.


If you are like us, the above situation would drive you potty and you'd end up looking for other ways to obtain maximum pwnage. Thankfully help is at hand. Our newly updated Combat course aims to help you, the penetration tester, learn how to tackle these obstacles.


Using an approach similar to capturing the flag, we take you through a whole host of obstacles that you might find during a career in pwnage. This isn't a simple SQLi in a login form, or a basic file upload vuln exploitation class, but one that gets the creative juices flowing. From chaining low/medium vulnerabilities, to exploiting logic flaws, over the two days, you will be pushed on all seven layers.


The solutions lie much more in technique and an out-of-box thought process than in the use of scripts or tools. Each exercise is designed to teach a specific lesson and is discussed in detail upon completion with the group.


If you are looking at polishing up your pwnage skills, learning how to tackle CTF competitions like the infamous Defcon one, then this is for you.


We don't offer this course frequently, but this year we will be offering it at the amazing Hack In The Box in Amsterdam on the 27th May AND at Blackhat USA's new home at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas on the 4th August